Ancient Jewish History

The time period that is associated with ancient Jewish history can be traced back to the peoples that had inhabited the fertile regions of the Middle East including the Tigris, Nile and Euphrates river valleys. According to scholars, this history refers directly to the Israelites who occupied an area known as Canaan that was located between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea. Many religious documents refer to an exodus by Jacob and twelve of his sons during a period of extreme famine; this group thereafter settling in northern Egypt. While it was believed that a forty-year pilgrimage out of Egypt (and away from the captors of the Israelites) took place, modern archaeological evidence indicates that Iron Age Israel arose directly from within Canaan as opposed to a supposed Egyptian exodus. More information about Israelites history Still, the period of ancient Jewish history was...

Jewish history: Middle Ages

Jews have been in existence since ancient times. By 1000 B.C.E. They had established a national, state called Israel. They also practiced a unique religion; Judaism. The Jewish nation was conquered severally and was absorbed into the Roman empire. The Jews revolted against the Roman rule and succeeded in liberating themselves at the second attempt. Historical events : early and late middle age During the whole of the Middle ages the Jews became more and more marginalized due to their economic and political disadvantages. For example, in the early middle ages, they were initially treated as citizens. This, however, changed in the late middle ages as a law was created to treat them as resident foreigners. They were under the protection of the Roman ruler. This left them vulnerable to his vagary. Jews were prohibited from owning Christian slaves and partaking Christian oaths, thus...

Jewish history: Early Modern period

The Jews gradually integrated in the modern European countries, the main reason being their conspicuous economic activities. The Jews in the early modern period were classified as either the court Jews who were business men and bankers and the port Jews who run the marine economy. During this period, they lived under the Ottoman Empire which had taken over turkey as their economic and cultural center. They were highly classed in this empire as they were the leading economic aggressors of the empire. This however was cut short by the ever constant religious and political pressure that was a common thing in the ever modernizing world. The role Poland and Lithuanian of the Jewish population On the other hand Poland-Lithuania was the place with the greatest population of the Jewish community. This however changed when the Jews were split by the Swedish wars and many were left dead. Those...

Jewish history in the 19th century

Napoleon needed to establish his authority throughout France and her empire when he came to power in 1799. One action that demonstrated his supremacy was the abolition of the ghetto laws. In Rome, within sight of the Vatican, the Catholic Church was forced to capitulate to Napoleonic might and Jews were liberated from the Roman ghetto. Throughout his empire Napoleon’s change in policy afforded the Jewish people a freedom, which had previously been denied to them. They could choose where they lived, could express their faith openly and were no longer required to wear yellow bonnets and armbands, which set them apart from other citizens. After changes in the policy of Napoleon At a time when other countries in Europe were tightening their laws on minority religious groups, the aftermath of the 1789 French Revolution led to a promotion of equality throughout France and the French...

Holocaust

This sad historical event took place in 1933 when Adolf Hitler ascended to power in Germany. The holocaust was brought to an end in 1945 when the Nazi regime was conquered by the Allied powers. The word holocaust was derived from the Greek language and means ‘ sacrifice by fire ‘. The holocaust was aimed at persecuting and slaughtering Jews. The Nazi’s also targeted homosexuals, disabled and the Jehovah witnesses for persecution. Anyone who opposed this gruesome regime was either murdered or sent to forced labour. The persecution took off on 15th September, 1995. Laws which were referred to as the Nuremberg laws were issued. The laws excluded Jews from public life. There was a law that outlawed extramarital sex and marriages between Germans and Jews. German Jews were also stripped of their citizenship. This was just a precedence for anti-Jewish legislation. Over the next couple of...